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Copying and Making DVD’s using Linux

Copying a DATA DVD to an ISO file.

After this process you’ll have an iso file of the original DVD on your hard drive.  The $HOME means to put the dvdrip.iso file in your home directory.

$ dd if=/dev/sr0 of=$HOME/dvdrip.iso

If this fails saying it can’t find your DVD drive try this one instead

$ dd if=/dev/cdrom of=$HOME/dvdrip.iso

Create a mount directory:
mkdir /mnt/iso
Mount the ISO image:
mount /path to dvdrip.iso -o loop /mnt/iso

See below for burning an ISO to a blank DVD.

Decode and RIP Movie DVD to disk

Install dvdbackup if it’s not already installed. Most distributions have a copy in their repository.
Debian/Ubuntu: [sudo] apt-get install dvdbackup
Mandriva: urpmi dvdbackup
Fedora/RedHat: yum install dvdbackup

If this is a commercial DVD you’ll also need “libdvdcss2″. Installing under Debian/Ubuntu requires adding a multimedia repository so you can install it.
For Ubuntu, see “https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Medibuntu”
For Debian, see “http://debian-multimedia.org/”

  • In a command shell, create and navigate to a directory in which you want to place the DVD movie directory and files.
  • To rip the entire DVD, run this command, (including the dot at the end):
    dvdbackup -Mv -i /dev/dvd -o .
  • To Rip just the title track, (including the dot at the end):
    dvdbackup -Fv -i /dev/dvd -o .

The DVD will be decoded and ripped to a new directory named after the DVD disk title. Example, for a DVD named “A Dog’s Breakfast” the directory will be named “DOGS_BREAKFAST_US”. It will contain a single “VIDEO_TS” directory.

From VIDEO_TS to .iso

You may need to install mkisofs. This is another standard distribution binary package so it should be in your repository.
Debian/Ubuntu: [sudo] apt-get install mkisofs
Mandriva: urpmi mkisofs
Fedora/RedHat: yum install mkisofs

Navigate to the directory containing the VIDEO_TS directory. Usually the name of the DVD itself. To create the dvd image with mkisofs and the -dvd-video commandline flag. This version of the command creates the iso image one directory above where the VIDEO_TS directory is located.

$ mkisofs -dvd-video -o ../NAME-OF-DVD.iso .
INFO:   UTF-8 character encoding detected by locale settings.
        Assuming UTF-8 encoded filenames on source filesystem,
        use -input-charset to override.
Unknown file type (unallocated) ./.. - ignoring and continuing.
  0.70% done, estimate finish Mon Nov 26 15:31:25 2007
  1.40% done, estimate finish Mon Nov 26 15:31:25 2007
  2.09% done, estimate finish Mon Nov 26 15:31:25 2007
  2.79% done, estimate finish Mon Nov 26 15:32:00 2007

 99.03% done, estimate finish Mon Nov 26 15:32:52 2007
 99.72% done, estimate finish Mon Nov 26 15:32:52 2007
yada yada

Now you have a dvd-video ready iso file:

$ cd ..
$ ls -lh *.iso

To be sure, you can check it:

$ isoinfo -l -i dvd.iso 

Directory listing of /
d---------   0    0    0            2048 Nov 26 2007 [    275 02]  .
d---------   0    0    0            2048 Nov 26 2007 [    275 02]  ..
d---------   0    0    0            2048 Nov 26 2007 [    276 02]  VIDEO_TS 

Directory listing of /VIDEO_TS/
d---------   0    0    0            2048 Nov 26 2007 [    276 02]  .
d---------   0    0    0            2048 Nov 26 2007 [    275 02]  ..
----------   0    0    0            8192 Nov 22 2007 [    281 00]  VIDEO_TS.BUP;1
----------   0    0    0            8192 Nov 22 2007 [    277 00]  VIDEO_TS.IFO;1
----------   0    0    0           36864 Nov 22 2007 [ 479292 00]  VTS_01_0.BUP;1
----------   0    0    0           36864 Nov 22 2007 [    285 00]  VTS_01_0.IFO;1
----------   0    0    0       980969472 Nov 22 2007 [    303 00]  VTS_01_1.VOB;1
----------   0    0    0           30720 Nov 22 2007 [ 716821 00]  VTS_02_0.BUP;1
----------   0    0    0           30720 Nov 22 2007 [ 479310 00]  VTS_02_0.IFO;1
----------   0    0    0       486391808 Nov 22 2007 [ 479325 00]  VTS_02_1.VOB;1

Burning the .iso

This needs to be done as root (not too much of a surprise as this requests low-level access to the dvd-burner). One of these should work for you. /dev/sr0 is for a SATA DVD drive.

# growisofs -dvd-compat -Z /dev/cdrom=dvd.iso 
# growisofs -dvd-compat -Z /dev/sr0=dvd.iso 
Executing 'builtin_dd if=dvd.iso of=/dev/hdc obs=32k seek=0'
/dev/hdc: "Current Write Speed" is 16.4x1385KBps.
         0/1468389376 ( 0.0%) @0x, remaining ??:??
         0/1468389376 ( 0.0%) @0x, remaining ??:??
         0/1468389376 ( 0.0%) @0x, remaining ??:??
         0/1468389376 ( 0.0%) @0x, remaining ??:??
         0/1468389376 ( 0.0%) @0x, remaining ??:??
   4063232/1468389376 ( 0.3%) @0.9x, remaining 138:08
  35028992/1468389376 ( 2.4%) @6.5x, remaining 17:43
  66486272/1468389376 ( 4.5%) @6.7x, remaining 10:32

1344405504/1468389376 (91.6%) @10.0x, remaining 0:13
1392017408/1468389376 (94.8%) @10.1x, remaining 0:08
1440120832/1468389376 (98.1%) @10.2x, remaining 0:03
builtin_dd: 716992*2KB out @ average 6.6x1385KBps

The result: a usable video dvd copy. And it works in the DVD-player at home (which is from way back when DVD-players weren’t given away with laundry soap).

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  1. September 24th, 2009 at 16:15 | #1
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